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    * Arakha *

    Nebuchadnezzar 4th

    ارخه


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    An Armenian named Arakha son of Haldita, aka Nebuchadnezzar 4th as was the last king of Babylon.In 529 BC, with the disturbances that occurred after the death of Cambyses II and the proclamation of Bardia as King, the Armenians revolted. Dariush 1st of Persia sent an Armenian named Dadarshi to suppress the revolt, later substituting him for the Persian Vaumisa who defeated the Armenians on May 20, 521 BC. Around the same time, another Armenian named Arakha ('Arakha' meaning 'crown prince' in Armenian), son of Haldita, claimed to be the son of the previous king of Babylon, Nabonidus, and renamed himself Nebuchadnezzar IV. His rebellion started on 25 August 521 but it was short-lived and was suppressed by Intaphrenes, Dariush' bow carrier on November, 27th. In Bisotoun Inscription King Dariush says: Then did I send an army unto Babylon. A Persian named Intaphrenes, my servant, I appointed as their leader, and thus I spoke unto them: 'Go, smite that Babylonian host which does not acknowledge me.' Then Intaphrenes marched with the army unto Babylon. Ahouramazda brought me help; by the grace of Ahouramazda Intaphrenes overthrew the Babylonians and brought over the people unto me. Of the twenty-second day of the month Markasanas they seized that Arakha who called himself Nebuchadnezzar, and the men who were his chief followers. Then I made a decree, saying: 'Let that Arakha and the men who were his chief followers be crucified in Babylon!' (Wikipedia) - Nebuchadnezzar IV   (Redirected from Arakha)
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    Statue of Nebuchadnezzar IV

    Nebuchadnezzar IV, also known as Arakha, was a self-proclaimed King of Babylon.

    Biography

    In 522 BC, with the disturbances that occurred after the death of Cambyses II and the proclamation of Bardiya as King, the Armenians revolted. Darius I of Persia sent an Armenian named Dâdarši to suffocate the revolt, later substituting him for the Persian Vaumisa who defeated the Armenians on May 20, 521 BC. Around the same time, another Armenian named Arakha (''Arakha'' meaning ''crown prince'' in Armenian), son of Haldita, claimed to be the son of the previous king of Babylon, Nabonidus, and renamed himself Nebuchadnezzar IV. His rebellion was short-lived and was suppressed by Intaphrenes, Darius''s bow carrier.

    According to Herodotus (Her. III, 70), Intaphrenes was one of the seven who helped Darius I usurp the throne from Smerdis the Magian (also known as Bardiya), who also usurped the throne from Cambyses II of Persia, for seven months, before and after Cambyses II death in 522 BC. Although that fact has come up for debate in recent years. Intaphrenes was also immediately put to death after the insurrection for trying to enter the King''s palace while he was lying with his wife (Her. III, 118). During the siege of Babylon, according to Herodotus (Her. III 152-160), Zopyros, son of Megabyzos (who had also been part of the seven usurpers (Her. 111,70)), mutilated himself to gain the trust of the Babylonians and gained entrance to the near impenatrable fortress. After a period of time, Zopyros had earned their trust so much that he was entrusted with the keys to all the gates. When that day arrived, Zopyros opened the gates and let Darius I of Persia in and victory was assured. As to whether or not Zopyros was his bow carrier, there is no mention of that information. However, the name Intaphrenes was never mentioned again in Herodotus after Intaphrenes death (Her. III, 118), nor any other Intaphrenes. The siege started soon after Darius I accession to the throne in 521 BC and last more than a year and seven months (Her. III, 152), bringing the siege to an end in the year 520 BC.

    Tags:Ahouramazda, Arakha, Armenian, Babylon, Bardia, Bisotoun, Cambyses, Dadarshi, Darius I, Dariush, Haldita, Herodotus, Intaphrenes, Magian, Nabonidus, Persia, Persian, Smerdis, Vaumisa, Wikipedia


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